Getting Creative With Contact Forms

Contact forms are the bread and butter of any business’ website. They’re how you gather new leads, convert prospects into real customers, and support your existing ones. They should be one of the places you focus on most when designing your website: A/B testing different solutions, getting creative with layouts, and optimizing conversion rate.

Unfortunately, most contact forms are the last priority when designing a website. They not only end up looking rushed or out of place within the context of the site’s design, but identical to every other site. The contact form is the end of the user’s journey through your website, and should be one of the key areas that differentiates you from your competition. It can be a real waste when your website uses beautiful fonts, colors and graphics like this:form-1And then your contact form looks like this:form-2

It can be difficult to come up with ways to get creative with your contact form. Most contact forms only need three pieces of information: the user’s name, a way to contact them, and a short message. The easiest way to do that is by simply using three text fields and a submit button. But getting creative with your contact form can improve the quality of your leads, increase your conversion rate, and bolster your brand’s reputation for good design.

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Provide Options

The default contact form is great, but not always the most suitable. They’re not great for receiving immediate help, or for complicated requests. By providing different options at this point, users can pick what suits them best. Here, Chargebee offers not only the default contact form, but also a call back request. Placing links to the company’s social networks here would also be a good idea (Twitter and Facebook are great ways for getting in touch with a company).form-3

Fit the Design

A beautifully-designed website will impress visitors and sell your business. But since your website is essentially a path leading towards your contact form, having this final point in the journey be comparatively disappointing will tell visitors that you don’t pay attention to details. If you can’t get such an important aspect of your own site right, how can they entrust you with their site?

You don’t have to go to extreme lengths to create an entirely new contact experience – simply taking the time to design the form around the rest of your site is a great first step. Saus, a creative communications studio, has styled their contact form based on a physical postcard. At its base, it’s still just a couple of text input fields and a submit button, but it fits perfectly into the context of the website.form-4

Give Context

One way to improve Saus’ form would be to give the user some expectation of when they might receive an answer. If they call immediately, will there be someone to answer? If they email, will it be minutes, hours or days until they receive a response? Huge does this well by appending the current time to each of their offices. Now the user can tell whether or not it’s currently business hours, and can get a rough estimation of how long a response might take. If it’s currently 2 AM, you won’t be getting a response until later in the morning. But if it’s 2 PM, you can probably expect one within the hour.

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Give a Head Start

One big discouraging influence in many contact forms is the blank text field. Name and email address are no problem – the user already knows those, it’s just a matter of being willing to share the information. But a big blank text field saying “Message” is daunting. The user needs to figure out exactly what needs to be shared, and worry about what they might have forgotten to include. A great solution to this problem is a mad-libs style contact form, like the one below  from Andrew Haglund.form-6

Eliminate The Blank Page

Even if you don’t want to go full mad-libs style, there are still ways to avoid the blank page syndrome. Prime users with multiple choice questions, then use placeholder text to further guide their answers.

Break It Up

Some contact forms won’t fit into the simple name-email-message structure, and will need to request a bit more information from the user. Placing a lot of text fields on screen at once is a sure way to scare users off, especially those with limited time. By breaking up long contact forms into sections, the form appears smaller and gives the illusion of taking a shorter time to fill out. Creative Digital Agency Harbr breaks their contact form into three steps. The final step is still a freeform text input field, but by this point the main questions have been answered, and this field is more of a support, rather than the critical piece.form-7

Get Graphical

Most form elements are pretty boring by default. Typeform spices up their designs by using simple illustrations instead of radio buttons. The illustrations remove the reliance on detailed copy, and allow users to skim the form. The less reading involved in your form, the faster users can fill it out, and the higher your conversion rate will be.form-8

Be Analytical

Whenever you’re making changes to your contact forms, make sure you track and analyze how the form performs before and after. If the changes you make reduce interaction rates, that’s not necessarily a bad thing! You might be reducing the rate of users asking questions that your website already answers. Keep track of how many useful conversions you get, and use the data to guide your design decisions.

Bridge the Gap Between Tech and Non-Tech

In the software industry, project managers and marketers want to get things done quickly, without the complications of bureaucracy. They want the business to grow, money to pour in and more and more new things to be implemented and revolutionize their company. Some of them want to become rich and famous, well – at least in their well-delimited sphere of marketers and managing staff.

Developers on the other hand want to focus on one task at a time, write amazing code that changes the web and servers, be challenged and tackle some of the most difficult computer science issues and solve them, and especially – not get constantly interrupted and distracted by endless trivial requests. “Programming is best done “in the zone” — a (pleasant) state of mind where your focus on the task is absolute and everything seems easy. This is probably much like “the zone” for musicians and athletes.” says Morgan Johansson who calls himself a “professional software tinkerer”, senior.  

A while ago on Quora someone asked programmers what they thought when hearing the phrase “I just need a tech co-founder.” A lot of rage almost instantly started pouring on from there as more and more techies joined the thread. “The[se non-tech founders] just care about equity,” commented cynically one developer. A couple of comments down, a CEO calls programmers “arrogant”, to which comes the response that non-techies should stop being so defensive, and everybody has ideas, let’s see how we put them into practice or rather, who puts them into practice for us.

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Soft Skills Aren’t Lesser Skills

As newer startups have commenced building more diversified teams with an increasing overlap in capabilities, there still remains a sense of mistrust between tech and non-tech, a confusion about how to assess a person’s “soft skills,” attributes that enable them to interact effectively and harmoniously with other people, the widespread assumption that these skills are inferior to “hard skills” – specific, teachable abilities required occupationally.

If programmers are able to understand “soft skills” as competencies, they may be more likely to appreciate their value and the potential of having a non-tech person on their team. Capabilities of this sort may be the ability to make difficult connections, among ideas and concepts that are at least apparently unrelated, an understanding of one’s place in the world, the ability to critically assess how systems work (and fail), an openness to learning, a “mental playfulness” as Bill Watterson calls it that allows one to “wander into new territories” even if unsure of what they may find.

Many in the tech-world undervalue soft skills: this is most evident in the belief that artificial intelligence (extremely capable at hard skills, but not so much at soft skills) will be the solution to all mankind’s problems. Google’s Director of Engineering Damon Horowitz, who studied artificial intelligence with a specialization in natural language processing, said that it was while studying philosophy that he came to realize that no matter how much he improved upon it, the AI system itself had its limitations and the changes would not be incremental. He says his focus then shifted from assuming that machines could resolve all of our problems to looking at how they could “facilitate human problem solving” instead.

One can argue that this expansion of the mind is also connected to the ability to have a broader or “macro” view of things. For instance, Reid Hoffman, founder of LinkedIn, said that through studying philosophy at Oxford, he wanted to “strengthen public intellectual culture.” Caterina Fake, founder of Findery, knew she wanted to create something around the idea of community and the sharing of stories through art. The acknowledgement of different kinds of capabilities is a necessary first step to bridge the trust gap between tech and non-tech.

What Do you Wish Your Boss Knew?

Most likely the director of your company is a non-tech figure. The manager who’s the people’s person / with people’s skills – or so you’d hope at least – and who’s really good at marketing the product and getting it out there, in the eye of the storm. But you, the dev, have your ideas and contributions too, to the management of the business – at least internally. Some of the best contributions a developer could bring to the non-techies’ team and managers to bridge the gap would be:

Empowering the non-techies to do technical work by teaching them or encouraging them to learn tools that are easy for anyone to learn. From how to use Photoshop and Illustrator Essentials down to using tools such as FormKeep to generate forms or bringing minimal edits to the stylesheets, these situations are win-win. Win for the developer which won’t have to come back on editing and re-editing or correcting typos that can be identified and fixed in a second by the non-tech, win for the non-tech in terms of adding hard skills to his trade. It might seem such a tiny thing, a change of size of the typeface, color, or other tweaks that may seem irrelevant and yet save you from having to dig through miles of code, while someone from the non-tech team that has stumbled upon the discovery while doing the QA testing could edit it there and then.

Helping them understand that perceived output is not the same as actual output. A poor developer will write unsustainable code, and then jump around from one bug to the next, spending nights and weekends in the office and impressing their superior’s. A good developer will spend time thinking about the problem (which from an outside perspective can look like daydreaming). They’ll write clean, stable code, clock out at 5pm, and appear lazy in comparison to the first developer. Yet the latter developer is infinitely more valuable to the company than the former. Unfortunately, this can be very difficult to perceive from the outside, especially for those not already tech-oriented. Engaging in discussions with developers about these issues can help to understand what it is developers do all day, and help form a good instinct for evaluating employees.

Problem pattern matching. Getting your boss to learn coding is a big ask, and takes away from more important things they could be doing. Getting your boss to learn how to think like a coder, on the other hand, is beneficial to everyone. Thinking like a coder is more often than not a simple game of matching problems with known solutions, and knowing when to apply which solution. With enough involvement in project details, your boss will eventually come to know the most common solutions.

Assist with the interviewing. This one is really a direct corollary of the contribution right above. Your developers might just be the right figures to help you select new personnel, especially when it comes to positions that can be difficult to understand from the outside. Although developers and designers, for example, can often be at odds with each other, a good developer can identify a designer they’ll get along with, and vice versa. Involving the developers can ensure you’ll have the right questions to ask to figure whether the interviewee is a good fit or not.

Recognize merits. Recognize when non-tech makes efforts to learn about the tech world. A little bit of gratefulness goes a long way, and it’s important to positively reinforce any behavior you want more of. If your manager is learning HTML, or the marketers are learning Photoshop, that helps communication between you and balances the workload. If they have trouble, help them out in a way that lets them learn for next time – don’t just speed through the job while their eyes gloss over.

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Learning to Think – An Independent Task

If you are a non-techie, odds are you might have more initiative towards taking tasks that push you out of your zone of comfort. Therefore perhaps the approach of Caterina Fake, oil painter and linguist turned techie entrepreneur, doesn’t seem so alien after all. She wanted to “translate” her training as an artist onto the web, and in the end programming languages, apart from being logical and mathematical are, precisely how their name goes, languages. More than learning to code, the long term goal for non-techies is learning how to think like a coder.

Developing a sense of logic in fact is not only mathematical – a science logics was a part of the human sciences for thousands of years, a branch of philosophy. It teaches and involves the use of precise and formal methods of thinking, such as abstractions, boolean logic, number and set theories so you can solve problems in an air-tight manner. One of the best ways to understand the human mind is to try to replicate it. Topics like AI, machine learning, natural language processing are not just part of computer science but also biology, psychology, philosophy, and mathematics. Damon Horowitz, Director of Engineering at Google, suggests that most of the evil in the world comes not from bad intentions but from “not thinking.”

What developers want most of all – to solve problems – could be the key to solving this gap. Creative problem solving is a skill considered both “hard” and “soft”. As such, it’s a key part of the lives of both tech and non-tech. Understanding that both camps are using the same skills in different ways can help the communication across the gap. The big difference is that while tech uses creative problem solving to solve technical problems, non-tech uses it to solve human problems.

That said, the best programmers are those who use creative problem solving to solve both technical and human problems at the same time. They’ve realized that the software that they’re writing is for people, even if it’s just the back end of a complicated system or a protocol that no one but other developers will ever use. They write documentation because it’s important. They help people use their code. They’re willing to go the extra mile and deal with a bit more complexity to give the people using their software the right solution. This is the point where techies’ and non-techies’ best intentions should converge, in the People First Axiom, because this is the goal that can ultimately bridge the gap.

 

How to Use Integrations to Save You Time Every Day

Software created by startups is innovative and develops much faster than old-school software. But these startups are prone to shutting down, pivoting, or getting acquired just as quickly as they rose in the first place. You might read about a new application, try it out and love it—only to have it get bought out and shut down less than a year later.

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Since you can’t rely completely on any one software, this modern software landscape encourages you to use lots of applications that do one thing really well, rather than one application that does everything. When you want to try a new application, or the one you were using gets shut down, you can sub it into your existing process quite easily.

This approach brings a new problem. Instead of all of your data being contained within the one application’s database, it’s now spread in 15 different databases. Each time you update one of those databases, it’s now out of sync with the other 14, until you manually update each of them.

Why Integrations?

I’m currently writing this on Dropbox Paper, as I love focusing on the writing instead of a million different formatting options. Once I’m finished writing it here, I’m going to copy and paste it into Google Docs, and then update Trello to let the rest of my team know they can review it and make comments and amendments.

They’ll often message me on Slack to let me know about any required modifications. Sometimes they’ll email me. Once the writing part is done, we’ve then gotta move everything from Google Docs into a few different applications. The blog gets moved to WordPress, the newsletter gets pasted into Drip, and we schedule all our social media posts through Buffer.

Phew.

That’s a lot of applications, and a lot of human interaction between them. Not only does this waste a lot of time copying and pasting information between applications, but it means that information is delayed until someone can pass it along. etc. Not only that, but unless I’ve got all the applications open at all times, I can easily miss a notification and trip up the whole process. Not only that, but copying and pasting has potential for human error, and the more copying and pasting there is, the greater the risk.

This is where integrations come in.

What are Integrations?

Most modern applications provide Open APIs, which allow you to run the software from outside the application. For example, you can create a new Trello card using just the command line. But for most of us, that’s not very useful. What is useful is combining two different applications’ APIs using Webhooks: messages that get triggered upon a certain event, and sent from one application to another.

What this means in non-developer is that instead of using the command line to create a new Trello card, you can take any application you’re already using, and get that to trigger some other application you’re already using. Without changing the applications you’ve learned to use, you can eliminate a lot of the manual work necessary to link them together.

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What This Means For Your Business

Entrepreneur Simon Senek, author of “Start With Why”, attended the Gathering of Titans, an annual 5-day retreat for entrepreneurs at MIT, and was shocked that many of the business owners in attendance had lost focus on why they started their business in the first place. They spent their time “poring over financials or some other easily measured result, and fixating on HOW they were to achieve those tangible results”, and had become totally removed from actually leading their businesses.

If you’re still manually generating reports or crossing your fingers that all your online orders have been properly fulfilled, you are spending unnecessary energy on operations that can be easily automated. This is time and energy better spent focusing on your core mission.

Getting Started With Integrations

The two most popular Integration Platforms as a Service (iPaaS) are IFTTT and Zapier. IFTTT allows you to connect two individual applications together using one simple statement: “If this, then that.” Users can create ‘recipes’ that combine the triggers and actions associated with each application, with no coding or technical knowledge required. IFTTT is, however, a more consumer-focused platform, whereas Zapier has a clear focus on small to midsize businesses and enterprises. Since that’s probably you, let’s focus on Zapier.

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Zapier is an integration service that lets businesses sync data, connect web applications and automate tasks without writing custom code or requiring extensive technical knowledge. Zapier offers a variety of unique pre-built connections called “zaps” and features over 200 online service providers. The Zapier Zapbook includes web apps such as Asan, Basecamp, Buffer, Disqus, Dropbox, Evernote, GitHub, HootSuite, FormKeep, MailChimp, Salesforce, Trello, WordPress, and Google Apps. Zapier recently launched a new API Status Board which monitors the uptime and downtime for every API used by Zapier.

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When getting started with integrations, take a look at each of your processes – design, development, sales, onboarding, etc.. Identify any point that involves simply copying and pasting data from one application to another. These are areas that are prone to error and waste time. Of particular importance are points in your processes that block someone’s work until the data is copied across. For example, if your contact form submissions go straight to your inbox, you’ll get a notification immediately. But your salespeople will have to wait until you have time to input the new lead into your CRM. With integrations, they’ll get a notification at the same time you do. You can even turn off your notifications! Your job there is done, and you can trust your salespeople to follow up as soon as they can.

Although today’s iPaaS vendors make it possible to connect many business, social and cloud applications together, iPaaS is not a silver bullet. The extent to which applications can be integrated depends on each application’s API. Basecamp recently released a fantastic new version of their product, but failed to provide an API. This means that users have the unfortunate choice of using the old version and keeping their integrations, or updating to the new version but reintroducing all that manual work.

However, as iPaaS becomes more popular and necessary, the demand for powerful APIs in every application will increase. And as more and more small web and mobile applications are created, the need to bring data and applications together will increase greatly.

How to Gain New Clients as an Agency

For budding agencies, finding new clients is a constant effort. Larger, established agencies often have enough word-of-mouth marketing to bring in more clients than they can handle. But smaller or early-stage agencies can’t rely solely on word-of-mouth promotion, simply because they don’t have the clients to do it for them. Although a marketing plan might seem like something for a more rooted agency, it’s in fact most important for younger agencies.

Design business expert David Baker looked at several hundred design firms over two decades, and his conclusion was that: yes, ok, you do need a graphic design marketing plan, but it’s not what will bring you most clients.

Understand Your Clients

Finding new clients as an agency is not like project management, accounting or IT. You must get intimately involved in the process. If you truly are after getting new – and worthwhile – clients, immerse yourself in your clients’ world rather than your peers’.

Understanding your clients’ needs will go a long way towards generating trust. Agency Scout Debra Giampoli says she won’t work with any agency who hasn’t done their homework. Agencies should know the roles of their potential clients and what they value in an agency. By finding out these things, you can more accurately target specific clients, with a higher success rate.

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Build up Confidence and Expertise

Successful people radiate self-assurance. Get out there and profess credible claims, with the certainty that you’ll be able to deliver with ease. Price your work accordingly – underpricing yourself puts you in a lower-tier market, and gives the impression of a less-capable agency. Higher rates may scare away some clients, but they’re generally clients you can afford to lose. In reverse, lower rates may place doubt into bigger clients – the ones your agency needs.

Finally, deliver with solid design solutions. Your reputation is built around what you repeatedly do, so if you’re over-promising and under-delivering on a regular basis, it won’t make for good word-of-mouth advertising. Not to mention the stress this adds, having to deal with upset and disappointed clients.

You may be able to burst into any room (or email inbox), but if you don’t have compelling things to say when communicating with clients, you’ll quickly lose their attention. Craft a statement that people won’t easily forget. Again, understanding your clients and their needs goes a long way to creating a truly compelling pitch.

Sharing is Caring

The ultimate lead generation tool is content marketing: keep an awesome blog that targets and attracts the kind of people you’d like to work with. In time you can establish your agency as an authority and thought leader. Social media is an obvious supplemental tool, but always back up your tweets and Instagram pics with long-form, educational content.

Whether you’re writing case studies, blog posts or short and sweet punchy tweets,  always keep in mind the entire user experience. Will your users reach your blog through social media, newsletters, or Google? How might this affect how they interact with your blog, and the rest of your website?

Don’t use your blog or social platforms for sales pitches. People will follow you if you’re providing useful and interesting content. If all you post is blatant advertising, followers will drop off as quickly as they sign up. Focus on posting up your best work, and let them speak for you.

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Keeping it Organized

Make a name for yourself by getting organized and delivering on time. Don’t be in a rush to accept more projects when your hands are already full. With an outstanding portfolio, good clients will be more likely to contact you ahead of time, without the expectation that you’ll start the project yesterday. “Reputation is the foundation to generating new job leads and keeping a steady stream of orders lined up in your email”, says Kevin Harter of Hongkiat and owner of Crystalint Media.

Follow up on any leads as soon as possible. Every hour you delay responding to leads reduces your chances of converting them to a client. If you’re not already, set up an automated email response to any contact form submission. Zapier is a great tool to integrate to whichever form solution you’re using. Use this initial email response to give your client a next step that isn’t just “wait for us to reply”. The more targeted you can make this email, the better. If you’re not able to set up a next step based off the limited information gathered in a contact form submission, maybe ask for a little more information from them. They’re already invested enough to submit a contact form, so asking for some more information about their project won’t raise much resistance.

Some agencies disregard databases when tracking their client interactions. This is a big mistake: databases are priceless. Maintain an up-to-date lead database, and keep track of any prospective clients. Record the name, address, email and phone number of any potential clients you’ve contacted, regardless of how you communicated with them. Don’t get discouraged if you don’t convert a lead to a client on the first, second, third or even fourth contact. 80% of sales require 5 follow-up calls after the initial meeting. 92% of salespeople give up before this 5th follow-up call, meaning 8% of sales people get 80% of the sales.

Find Your Niche

Set your agency apart from your competition by delivering what others can’t. Whether it’s punctuality, beautiful user-focused design, or the ability to creatively solve problems, let your prospects know about it. “Clients will buy from a place where they are likely to get something extra. Find the ‘extra’ for your business,” says Kevin Harter.

A Cohesive Marketing Plan

In spite of what you might plan or dream will happen, most great clients will come from indirect efforts such as client connection, a vendor, employee or supporter connection. But while it could be any of these things that cinches the deal, all of your efforts play a part. An agency with a good reputation, educational content marketing, a strong customer understanding and a little something extra will always beat out a rival agency with a weak spot in any of these aspects. If you can’t promote yourself well, how can a client expect you to promote them well?

Designing Forms that Convert

A huge part of the success or failure of an online business depends on its forms and their ability to convert viewers into paying customers. Contact forms must gather essential information on leads, and checkout forms must endear enough trust for users to hand over their credit card details.

Designing forms is an art. There are many subtle elements: your forms must be brief yet exhaustive, noticeable yet non-intrusive, unambiguous yet not trivial, minimal yet interesting. Web forms should be about the user experience above all else – but they must also provide you with the data you need to run your business.

Luckily, there’s a lot of simple things you can do to increase your conversion rates without sacrificing data quality.

Reduce form length

Many companies have massively increased conversion rates by just removing a few unnecessary fields from their form. Expedia, for example, eliminated one field (company name), and gained $12 million/year in profit. Imaginary Landscape compacted their form from 11 fields down to 4 and found a 120% increase in conversions. Even better – the field they removed had no real impact on the quality of leads generated.

Don’t ask for phone numbers

Almost every contact form involves asking for an email address, but some forms ask for a phone number as well. Including a phone number field decreases your conversion rates by about 5%. For businesses that rely on post-click sales calls, this may be a worthy trade. But for most, it’s better to leave it out, or at least make it optional. In one study by Luke Wroblewski, making a phone field optional led to a 37% drop-off on the phone number field entries, but doubled the conversion rate of the whole form.

Show the password

By default, any password field in a form masks all the characters with asterisks. But like Reset buttons on forms, this seems to be one of those 20-year-old decisions that have become “just the way things are done”. Password masking then led to people making mistakes when entering their password and not being able to log in, which created the “Confirm Password” field that everyone loves.

But if we just take a step back and reconsider whether that 20-year-old design decision is still serving us well, maybe we can remove another form field! Many companies like MailChimp and Amazon are now presenting a single password field, along with a checkbox to show the password as plain text. In one A/B test, Formisimo found that replacing the Confirm Password field with a Show Password checkbox increased conversions by 56% and decreased the number of corrections made (from mis-typing or second-guessing) by 24%. Interestingly though, it had no effect on the password reset request rate.

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Use the right inputs

When you’re deciding which form fields to keep and which to throw out, keep in mind that not all fields are equal. The cost of keeping or adding a field depends on what type of field you’re adding. One extra text input field won’t do much to your conversion rates – just a $12 million/year loss . Adding one text box can drop your rates by almost 10%. It makes sense: most single-line text input fields don’t involve any creativity or decision-making. It doesn’t require effort for a user to recall their name or email address. A radio button is slightly more difficult, but at least all the possible answers are pre-defined. But a text area means that the user has to get creative and come up with a response on the spot – usually a complex message or comment. If you must include a text box, think about marking it optional.

Dropdown boxes aren’t as bad as text boxes, but they’re still significantly worse than single-line input fields. If your dropdown box only has a few options (5 or less), try replacing it with radio buttons. Radio buttons are faster to interact with because they allow the user to see the answers before they click on the input.

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Real Time Validation

If you’re only validating upon form submission (or worse, not at all), you’re missing out on a really easy conversion rate boost. Luke Wroblewski ran a few studies and found that real-time validation increased conversion rates by 22%, decreased errors by 22% and decreased completion time by 42%.

Focus on your Call to Action

Ok, so now you’ve optimized the hell out of your form fields. What else can we do to increase conversion rates? Let’s look at the Call to Action (CTA). Minor changes to your CTA can make a surprisingly big difference on conversion rates.

The first thing to look at is the color and position of the CTA. You may have heard of HubSpot’s study – they ran an A/B test on one of their client’s websites, and simply changing the CTA’s color from green to red improved conversion rates by 21%. So does this mean that you should immediately go out and change all your green buttons to red? Not necessarily. Take a look at the website HubSpot was testing:

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The logo is green, the icons are green, the screenshot is green – so of course the red button stands out a lot more than the green button. Take a look at the following design – which of these buttons do you think will convert better?

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So the lesson to take out of this is not “make all your CTA buttons red”, but “make sure your CTA buttons contrast well against the rest of your site”.

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Once that’s handled, take a look at your CTA copy. It may seem that as long as it’s clear which button is the “Submit” button, and it says something like “Submit,” you can’t go wrong. In fact, Dan Zarella found that “Submit” is one of the worst words to use for your CTA. Take a look at the graph below: “Click Here” performed almost twice as well as “Submit,” and more than three times better than “Register.”

cta-text

But don’t go rushing off to change your CTA buttons to “Click Here” just yet – think about how to best apply this to your design. Optimizely increased their conversion rates 27% by changing their CTA text from “Get Started” to “Test It Out.” They concluded that “this language made it more clear that the user could try it immediately without a long process. We thought “Get Started” presented a more hands-on, involved process.” Taking another look at the above graph, this makes sense. “Click Here” involves absolutely no commitment – it’s purely a directive. “Register” on the other hand, sounds like going to the DMV and spending three hours in line.

A/B Testing

Before you make any modifications to your forms, use an A/B testing setup to compare your conversion rates before and after. Maybe you’ll be able to add in a new input field without sacrificing conversion rates. Perhaps you’ll finally get an objective answer on what text to place in your CTA button. With time, iteration and solid data, you’ll be able to increase form conversion rates and boost your client base.