How to Sell Your Client On a Better Converting Type of Form

You’ve heard the old adage: The client is always right.

But every so often there comes a time when you – the designer or developer – know that there’s a better way. After all, you work with websites on a daily basis, and you see how well things convert or don’t convert. You have years of experience under your belt to know that sometimes certain methods work better than others.

So when a client says, “We want it this way,” there may come a time when you have to respond, “Well actually, here’s another suggestion…”

When it comes to creating forms in particular, some form types just work better than others for certain audiences. And if your gut is telling you that a full-page form would work better, then that’s what you should go with.

But how do you tell that to your client?

Here’s how to sell them on a better way, even if they’re picky.

Here are 5 Form Type Alternatives to Suggest to Clients.

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Certain Forms Work Better Than Others

According to the B2B Technology Marketing Community, “61 percent of B2B marketers struggle to generate high quality leads.” Forms play a big role in that struggle, and in some ways, designers and developers have an inside scoop on which forms work better than others.

Generally that’s because you’re the one stuck doing a redesign when conversions are low. And it’s true that some forms convert better than others.

For instance, forms shown above the fold can improve conversion rates, but sometimes only for audiences that are already familiar with the client’s brand.

According to Groove Digital Marketing, short forms or progressive forms work much better for mobile users, while Convert With Content suggests using multi-step forms instead of long forms because they work better for those needing more information without sacrificing conversions.

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While you may not have it all memorized off the top of your head, chances are that you know from experience which forms will work in context and which ones don’t. (It’s okay to trust your gut, too).

Of course, once you realize that the form types your client wants may not be the best solution for their audience (or even for their site’s design), it comes time to suggest something different. So how do you do that, exactly?

How to Convince Them You’re Right

Your primary job is really to keep the client happy, but as much as possible you should try to make sure that your client’s endeavors are successful.

While that can be hard to do with a client that is picky or demanding (they simply must have their way), it is possible to suggest an idea that (you feel) will help them achieve their results faster. But you don’t want to come across as a know-it-all, or you’ll risk bruising their ego.

Here are a few ways to try to get your point across without sounding like a demanding diva.

Speak from Experience

While your client has expertise in their respective field, and they probably know their audience better than you, that doesn’t mean you don’t know what you’re talking about. After all, you work with forms and websites, and you’ve had clients come back and say “Hey, this isn’t working, can we change this?”

You’re an expert, and you need to own it. More importantly, you need to show that your opinions have merits. If you want to suggest a new idea, you’ll have to show them that you have their best interests at heart. Which leads to…

Show, Don’t Tell

If you can show how a different form type improved another client’s conversions – whether from your own experience or from an article or post you read about – and you know that your current client has a similar audience, it’s a good idea to grab that data and have it handy.

It can also be helpful for a client to see exactly what you’re suggesting to avoid any confusion. Create a mockup of how the new form would work, and show them step-by-step why it will work better for their audience so they have actual social proof to consider while making decisions.

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Keep It Consistent

If you’re suggesting something that may be totally out of left field, you still want to reassure them that you understand their audience and brand. Again, this is where a mockup can help, showing the form in action while using their images and site design as a backdrop.

But even if your form idea is way out there, do as much as you can to stick to their audience. If they use business-formal language, don’t start their forms with “Howdy, y’all!” If their colors are blue and gold, don’t design a form that’s purple and grey. It should be a no brainer, but as much consistency as you can keep, the better your “crazy” idea will go over, especially with picky clients.

Offer It Like an “Upgrade”

Sociologist Alvin Gouldner says that no society on earth can escape from reciprocity, or the idea that if someone’s giving you something of value, you should return the favor. Consider suggesting the changes as if you’re providing an exclusive service above and beyond the norm, and they may feel obligated to say yes just because you’re offering.

“We’ve offered this to a few of our other clients and they’ve seen much higher conversions than the standard form. We notice you have a similar audience, would you like to try this new form type? We can create a mockup if you’d like to see it.” More often than not, your client will at least consider your idea rather than rejecting it outright.

Don’t Be Rude

Finally, presentation is everything. This should go without saying, but if you’re rude to the client, they will be primed to reject anything you say on the sheer principle of you being unlikable. While business professionalism can go a long way, it’s about balancing the authoritative tone of an expert with the courtesy of a customer service representative.

According to Call Proof, it’s about listening, empathizing, and under-selling. You have to see your client as more than just a dollar sign, and treat them as you would your family or friends.

These 5 form alternatives are perfect ideas to pitch to clients.

Final Thoughts

Sometimes you have a feeling that a different type of form will work better than others with the client’s design or will generate more leads. Since you have some experience to back up your ideas, you want to suggest those changes to your client.

If you’re looking to convince a client that your idea has merit, be sure to present yourself like an expert. Use data and as much information as you can, and create a mockup so they can see exactly what you’re talking about.

Make sure it stays consistent with their branding and actually helps them. You can do this by offering it up as something that will genuinely add value to their business.

And, above all, communicate like a customer service rep – listen, engage, and don’t forget to play nice. Soon your clients will be falling over themselves to implement your awesome new ideas.

How to Handle Design Feedback Like a Pro

Possibly the scariest part of any designer or developer’s job is turning in your design to a client.

The trouble is that you never really know if your client is going to love it or hate it. Depending on the client, submitting a preview can mean plenty of additional hours spent reworking things to get them to up to expectations—and that’s never fun.

No one likes being told that their design choices are wrong. It can be difficult not to react in frustration to negative feedback, but how you handle yourself can mean the difference between successfully completing a project or losing a client for good.

So, how exactly do you handle feedback well?

You want to ask good questions, use every resource available, and try to turn a potentially negative experience into a positive. Here’s how.

Don’t forget to grab our list of even more client preview tools for designers.

Asking Questions That Clarify

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The reality is that no designer really loves feedback. Ideally you want your clients to love your project and understand your genius from the moment they lay eyes on it.

Unfortunately, feedback is an integral part of being a designer, but that doesn’t mean it’s necessarily a bad thing. Not only does it help the client clarify and refine their desired outcomes, it also helps you become a better designer by letting you stretch your genius outside of your normal limits.

But, the ultimate goal is to get feedback that’s helpful towards both those ends, and one of the best ways to do that is to take charge of the feedback before it even comes your way. You can do this by providing a series of questions that your clients can respond to.

Some example questions could include:

  • Does this reach your target market in the way you imagined?
  • Does this feel “on brand” or “on message” for you?
  • Were you able to find all the information you were looking for?
  • Do you find the information or design valuable for your users?
  • How does this compare to your expectations?
  • What are some noticeable weaknesses? Strengths?
  • When you see this for the first time, what thoughts come to mind?
  • Would you recommend this [design/site/etc.] to others?

Not only do these questions help clients provide feedback that you can actually implement, but they also minimize comments and dialogue that aren’t helpful or that you can do nothing about.

Instead of simply asking for general or vague feedback or saying, “Let me know what you think”, try starting a conversation that will be productive for both parties involved, while giving you a little more control.

Using Preview/Prototype Tools

Since feedback can often take up a lot of time depending on the complexity of the design (or client) involved, using resources and tools to help minimize that effort will go a long way.

Using preview or prototype tools will help you move the conversation along, make the changes you need in real time, and also make you look extremely professional and put together.

You can either use these tools before a project begins knowing that you’ll have to share them with clients or team members, or you can use these tools to help you after you’ve already built the project and need a way to share and collaborate with minimal effort.

Here are a couple of the top preview tools to consider:

Red Pen – This app allows you to upload your current project, add notes, and share your preview URL via email to clients. There’s no need to log in, as it remembers your link so you can retain all ownership of your uploads.

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Bounce – Bounce lets you collaborate between project members using screenshots or by uploading images. You can also make notes, add names to specific elements, and share your feedback through a URL or social media link.

If you need to build or share a website that will have interactive elements, you might want to consider:

Avocode – Avocode makes it easy for frontend developers to code websites or apps by syncing with your PSD files. You can leave notes for other team members, export, upload and share sites, and give specific feedback while visually comparing design versions.

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Flinto for Mac – This app lets you create prototypes for mobile as well as web and desktop apps, so if your client really wants to see what a mobile app would look like, you can build an example fairly quickly.

Adobe Experience Design CC – Adobe UX Design also lets you create prototypes for websites and mobile apps, with a preview feature that allows for live changes, as well as a sharing feature for quick feedback.

Turning Negative Into Positive

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Let’s say that you’ve done everything on your end to help create a positive experience—you’ve asked the right questions, you’ve provided the right sharing platform—but at the end of the day the client still isn’t happy. Does that mean doom for your project?

Negative feedback doesn’t have to be a bad thing if you say and do a couple important things:

Don’t take it personally. Remember that you did your best with the knowledge that you had, and now that you have more, you can make changes that are more in line with the client’s wishes.

Restate intentions. Sometimes things get lost in translation, so rephrase or restate what you think you’re hearing the client say so that everyone is on the same page. It can also be helpful to ask more questions or for suggestions they might have that can be easily applied to the project.

Do your research. If the client is asking for something that can’t be done, know about it before hand so you don’t say yes and then have to backtrack later. If you’re not sure about something, let them know you’ll discuss it with your team or look into it and get back to them as soon as possible.

Make a list of actionable items. Sometimes what a client wants just isn’t going to be a reality—you know that, but they might not. Give them a list of things you can change and explain to them as thoroughly as possible why some solutions just won’t work.

Provide alternatives. For those things that really can’t (or shouldn’t) be changed based on the feedback provided, offer one or two alternatives. Don’t simply ask the client for things they’d like to see instead, but present them with options so that they don’t ask for something else you can’t follow through on.

Respond promptly. There’s nothing that screams “unprofessional” like taking too long to reply to an email or missing a scheduled phone call or meeting. Do your best to provide responses quickly and assure them that they’re your priority.

Need more preview tools? We’ve got six more for you right here.

Final Thoughts

While receiving feedback isn’t always the best part of the job, it can be a helpful experience for both you and your client if you’re able to handle it professionally.

One of the best things you can do is ask questions and constantly clarify things throughout the project so that your client can rest easy that you know what you’re doing.

Being sure to use any tools or resources that helps clients be a part of the decision-making process can also help foster a sense of loyalty as well as move the project along faster.

And should negative feedback still come your way, don’t panic. Keep asking questions, keep clarifying, and keep responding and your clients will thank you.